A shared decision-making communications workshop improves internal medicine resident skill, risk-benefit education, and counseling attitude (2022)

Abstract

Objective: We assessed the impact of a workshop on first-year medicine residents (PGY1) shared decision-making (SDM) communication skill, risk-benefit education, and attitude. Methods: A SDM skills-focused workshop was integrated into an academic medical center PGY1 ambulatory rotation in 2016–2017. Pre/post recordings of virtual Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) with standardized patients sharing decisions were scored using OPTION5. Risk-benefit education, including decision aid use, was measured. Pre/post surveys assessed SDM practice attitudes and perceived barriers. Results: 31 of 48 (65%) PGY1 workshop attendees completed pre/post OSCEs yielding 62 videos. OPTION5 scores improved from 27/100 pre to 56/100 post (p < 0.001). Pre/post increases in integration of qualitative (15/31 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) and quantitative (3/31 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) risk measures, and decision aids (1/3 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) were observed. Pro-SDM attitude of decisional neutrality increased 16.6% pre to 71.9% post-survey (P < 0.001). Barriers to SDM remain. Conclusion: This PGY1 workshop with virtual OSCEs improved SDM communication skills, the ability to find and provide risk-benefit education, and SDM-facilitating attitude. Practice implications: Residency programs can improve SDM skills, risk-benefit education, and attitudes with a workshop intervention. Perceived time constraints and cognitive biases regarding risk-benefit estimates should be addressed to ensure quality SDM in practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1018-1024
Number of pages7
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume105
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

Keywords

  • Evidence-based medicine
  • Graduate medical education
  • Patient communication
  • Patient education
  • Residency education
  • Risk-benefit
  • Shared decision-making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Access to Document

Other files and links

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A shared decision-making communications workshop improves internal medicine resident skill, risk-benefit education, and counseling attitude'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

(Video) How to Prevent "I Wish I'd Known" through Shared Decision Making Training - Tsuzumi Kanaoka

View full fingerprint

Cite this

  • APA
  • Standard
  • Harvard
  • Vancouver
  • Author
  • BIBTEX
  • RIS

Amell, F., Park, C., Sheth, P., Elwyn, G. (2022). A shared decision-making communications workshop improves internal medicine resident skill, risk-benefit education, and counseling attitude. Patient Education and Counseling, 105(4), 1018-1024. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2021.07.040

A shared decision-making communications workshop improves internal medicine resident skill, risk-benefit education, and counseling attitude. / Amell, Fred; Park, Caroline; Sheth, Pooja et al.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 105, No. 4, 04.2022, p. 1018-1024.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Amell, F, Park, C, Sheth, P, Elwyn, G 2022, 'A shared decision-making communications workshop improves internal medicine resident skill, risk-benefit education, and counseling attitude', Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 105, no. 4, pp. 1018-1024. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2021.07.040

Amell F, Park C, Sheth P, Elwyn G, LeFrancois D. A shared decision-making communications workshop improves internal medicine resident skill, risk-benefit education, and counseling attitude. Patient Education and Counseling. 2022 Apr;105(4):1018-1024. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2021.07.040

(Video) Dan Matlock, MD, MPH & Larry Allen, MD - "Shared Decision Making in Practice: ICDs/LVADs"

Amell, Fred ; Park, Caroline ; Sheth, Pooja et al. / A shared decision-making communications workshop improves internal medicine resident skill, risk-benefit education, and counseling attitude. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2022 ; Vol. 105, No. 4. pp. 1018-1024.

@article{2710599d6d274152a3678010fcf473cb,

title = "A shared decision-making communications workshop improves internal medicine resident skill, risk-benefit education, and counseling attitude",

abstract = "Objective: We assessed the impact of a workshop on first-year medicine residents (PGY1) shared decision-making (SDM) communication skill, risk-benefit education, and attitude. Methods: A SDM skills-focused workshop was integrated into an academic medical center PGY1 ambulatory rotation in 2016–2017. Pre/post recordings of virtual Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) with standardized patients sharing decisions were scored using OPTION5. Risk-benefit education, including decision aid use, was measured. Pre/post surveys assessed SDM practice attitudes and perceived barriers. Results: 31 of 48 (65%) PGY1 workshop attendees completed pre/post OSCEs yielding 62 videos. OPTION5 scores improved from 27/100 pre to 56/100 post (p < 0.001). Pre/post increases in integration of qualitative (15/31 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) and quantitative (3/31 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) risk measures, and decision aids (1/3 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) were observed. Pro-SDM attitude of decisional neutrality increased 16.6% pre to 71.9% post-survey (P < 0.001). Barriers to SDM remain. Conclusion: This PGY1 workshop with virtual OSCEs improved SDM communication skills, the ability to find and provide risk-benefit education, and SDM-facilitating attitude. Practice implications: Residency programs can improve SDM skills, risk-benefit education, and attitudes with a workshop intervention. Perceived time constraints and cognitive biases regarding risk-benefit estimates should be addressed to ensure quality SDM in practice.",

keywords = "Evidence-based medicine, Graduate medical education, Patient communication, Patient education, Residency education, Risk-benefit, Shared decision-making",

author = "Fred Amell and Caroline Park and Pooja Sheth and Glyn Elwyn and Darlene LeFrancois",

note = "Funding Information: Tor Tosteson, Sc. D., Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Dartmouth Institute, Lebanon NH supported by UL1TR001086 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) who reviewed analytic methods. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 Elsevier B.V.",

year = "2022",

month = apr,

doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2021.07.040",

language = "English (US)",

volume = "105",

pages = "1018--1024",

journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",

(Video) Effective and Compassionate Communication for Informed, Shared Decision-Making

issn = "0738-3991",

publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A shared decision-making communications workshop improves internal medicine resident skill, risk-benefit education, and counseling attitude

AU - Amell, Fred

AU - Park, Caroline

AU - Sheth, Pooja

AU - Elwyn, Glyn

AU - LeFrancois, Darlene

N1 - Funding Information:Tor Tosteson, Sc. D., Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Dartmouth Institute, Lebanon NH supported by UL1TR001086 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) who reviewed analytic methods. Publisher Copyright:© 2021 Elsevier B.V.

PY - 2022/4

Y1 - 2022/4

N2 - Objective: We assessed the impact of a workshop on first-year medicine residents (PGY1) shared decision-making (SDM) communication skill, risk-benefit education, and attitude. Methods: A SDM skills-focused workshop was integrated into an academic medical center PGY1 ambulatory rotation in 2016–2017. Pre/post recordings of virtual Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) with standardized patients sharing decisions were scored using OPTION5. Risk-benefit education, including decision aid use, was measured. Pre/post surveys assessed SDM practice attitudes and perceived barriers. Results: 31 of 48 (65%) PGY1 workshop attendees completed pre/post OSCEs yielding 62 videos. OPTION5 scores improved from 27/100 pre to 56/100 post (p < 0.001). Pre/post increases in integration of qualitative (15/31 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) and quantitative (3/31 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) risk measures, and decision aids (1/3 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) were observed. Pro-SDM attitude of decisional neutrality increased 16.6% pre to 71.9% post-survey (P < 0.001). Barriers to SDM remain. Conclusion: This PGY1 workshop with virtual OSCEs improved SDM communication skills, the ability to find and provide risk-benefit education, and SDM-facilitating attitude. Practice implications: Residency programs can improve SDM skills, risk-benefit education, and attitudes with a workshop intervention. Perceived time constraints and cognitive biases regarding risk-benefit estimates should be addressed to ensure quality SDM in practice.

AB - Objective: We assessed the impact of a workshop on first-year medicine residents (PGY1) shared decision-making (SDM) communication skill, risk-benefit education, and attitude. Methods: A SDM skills-focused workshop was integrated into an academic medical center PGY1 ambulatory rotation in 2016–2017. Pre/post recordings of virtual Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) with standardized patients sharing decisions were scored using OPTION5. Risk-benefit education, including decision aid use, was measured. Pre/post surveys assessed SDM practice attitudes and perceived barriers. Results: 31 of 48 (65%) PGY1 workshop attendees completed pre/post OSCEs yielding 62 videos. OPTION5 scores improved from 27/100 pre to 56/100 post (p < 0.001). Pre/post increases in integration of qualitative (15/31 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) and quantitative (3/31 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) risk measures, and decision aids (1/3 vs 31/31, p < 0.001) were observed. Pro-SDM attitude of decisional neutrality increased 16.6% pre to 71.9% post-survey (P < 0.001). Barriers to SDM remain. Conclusion: This PGY1 workshop with virtual OSCEs improved SDM communication skills, the ability to find and provide risk-benefit education, and SDM-facilitating attitude. Practice implications: Residency programs can improve SDM skills, risk-benefit education, and attitudes with a workshop intervention. Perceived time constraints and cognitive biases regarding risk-benefit estimates should be addressed to ensure quality SDM in practice.

KW - Evidence-based medicine

(Video) Learning medicine, learning communications?

KW - Graduate medical education

KW - Patient communication

KW - Patient education

KW - Residency education

KW - Risk-benefit

KW - Shared decision-making

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85111944377&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85111944377&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2021.07.040

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2021.07.040

M3 - Article

C2 - 34362609

AN - SCOPUS:85111944377

VL - 105

SP - 1018

EP - 1024

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

(Video) Senate Floor Session - 04/26/2022

IS - 4

ER -

FAQs

Why is communication important in shared decision making? ›

It enhances patient autonomy and patient-centeredness. [14,15]. Within the context of palliative medicine, SDM implies that HCPs inform their patients about the different treatment options available, the possibility of refraining from treatment, and the outcome of these different options [16].

What is shared decision making in healthcare? ›

Shared decision making (SDM) is a process whereby clinicians collaboratively help patients to reach evidence-informed and value-congruent medical decisions. This process is especially relevant in screening for conditions in which there is a close trade-off between harms and benefits.

How can shared decision making be improved? ›

Here are four best practices to promote effective shared decision making.
  1. Assess & address patient values, preferred language, and health literacy levels. ...
  2. Practice active collaboration. ...
  3. Use evidence-based educational resources and decision aids. ...
  4. Streamline the SDM process into daily workflow.
26 May 2018

Why is communication important in nursing decisions? ›

Nurses who take the time to listen and understand the concerns of each of their patients are better prepared to address issues as they arise, resulting in better patient outcomes.

What are the benefits of shared decision making in healthcare? ›

Benefits. It allows people to discuss and share information. This makes sure people have a good understanding of the benefits, harms and possible outcomes of different options. It empowers people to make decisions about the treatment and care that is right for them at that time.

What is an example of shared decision making? ›

Shared decision- making (SDM) is the conversation that happens between a patient and clinician to reach a healthcare choice together. Examples include decisions about surgery, medications, self-management, and screening and diagnostic tests.

What are the 3 key elements of shared decision making? ›

In this overview we describe the three essential elements of shared decision making: recognizing and acknowledging that a decision is required; knowing and understanding the best available evidence; and incorporating the patient's values and preferences into the decision.

What are the responsibilities of patients and doctors in shared decision making? ›

The essential steps include first informing patients of the need for a decision, then explaining the various facts involved; after which, it is important to elicit patients' preferences and goals. Once the treatment options and outcomes important to patients are identified, an actual decision can be made.

What are three examples of decision making factors for healthcare? ›

Shared decision-making in healthcare and improve patient health outcomes and support patient-centeredness during care encounters.
  • Strong patient education, decision aids.
  • Understanding patient cultural and personal preferences.
  • Engaging family and caregivers.
14 Sept 2017

Does shared decision making improve patient outcomes? ›

Shared decision making has been shown to result in treatment plans that better reflect patients' goals; increase patient and physician satisfaction; improve patient-physician communication; have a positive effect on outcomes; and, sometimes reduce costs.

Why is decision making important in healthcare? ›

Participation in decision-making helps health care providers to understand patients' preferences in the treatment options. Also, it helps health care providers to determine the type of drugs that are suitable for the patient.

How can EBP be valuable in shared decision making between healthcare providers and patients? ›

The EBP process involves sharing information with the patient about diagnosis and treatment, educating the patient about the disease and treatment options, and informing the patient about the strength of the evidence, as well as the risks, benefits, and possible outcomes [68].

Why is communication important between healthcare professionals? ›

Effective communication among staff encourages effective teamwork and promotes continuity and clarity within the patient care team. At its best, good communication encourages collaboration, fosters teamwork, and helps prevent errors.

How does communication improve patient care? ›

Respectful communication between nurses and patients can reduce uncertainty, enhance greater patient engagement in decision making, improve patient adherence to medication and treatment plans, increase social support, safety, and patient satisfaction in care [12, 13].

Why is communication important in the medical field? ›

Communication in medicine is considered as a fundamental clinical skill to establish a relationship with the patient, paving a way to successful diagnosis and treatment. Communication skills training is internationally accepted as an essential component of medical education.

What are the principles of shared decision making? ›

Shared decision making (SDM) has been defined as: 'an approach where clinicians and patients share the best available evidence when faced with the task of making decisions, and where patients are supported to consider options, to achieve informed preferences”.

Why is shared decision making important identify three reasons? ›

The benefits of shared decision making include enabling evidence and patients' preferences to be incorporated into a consultation; improving patient knowledge, risk perception accuracy and patient–clinician communication; and reducing decisional conflict, feeling uninformed and inappropriate use of tests and treatments ...

What are the benefits of practicing decision making? ›

One of the most useful benefits of being an excellent decision maker is saving time. You know which decisions you can make just trusting your instinct, and which ones need some research first. The ability to make educated, yet fast decisions will free up your time from overthinking!

What are the five steps to shared decision making? ›

Essential Steps to Shared Decisionmaking
  1. Step 1: Seek your patient's participation. ...
  2. Step 2: Help your patient explore and compare treatment options. ...
  3. Step 3: Assess your patient's values and preferences. ...
  4. Step 4: Reach a decision with your patient. ...
  5. Step 5: Evaluate your patient's decision.

What are barriers to shared decision making? ›

The three most often reported barriers were: time constraints (18/28), lack of applicability due to patient characteristics (12/28), and lack of applicability due to the clinical situation (12/28).

What are the decision making strategies? ›

A 7-Step Decision-Making Strategy
  • Investigate the situation in detail.
  • Create a constructive environment.
  • Generate good alternatives.
  • Explore your options.
  • Select the best solution.
  • Evaluate your plan.
  • Communicate your decision, and take action.

What is shared decision making in education? ›

Shared decision making is driven by the belief that the most effective choices are made when those affected by the decisions are involved in the decision making process. It is a process by which members of an educational community cooperate in identifying and implementing activities to advance and improve learning.

Is shared decision making the same as informed consent? ›

Informed consent is the legal process used to promote patient autonomy; shared decision making is a widely promoted ethical approach. These processes may most usefully be seen as distinct in clinically and ethically important respects.

How do health professionals make decisions? ›

The doctor uses specialist knowledge and experience and clinical judgement, and the patient's views and understanding of their condition, to identify which options for investigating, treating or managing the patient's condition (including the option to take no action) are clinically appropriate.

What are the fundamental values that guide medical practice according to the model of shared decision-making? ›

SDM relies on the basic premise of both patient autonomy and informed consent. The model recognizes that patients have personal values that influence the interpretation of risks and benefits differently from the way a physician interprets them.

Which of the following is imperative for shared decision-making? ›

The imperative for shared decision-making rests on the principles of good clinical practice, respecting patients' right to know: that their informed preferences should be the basis for professional actions.

What are the disadvantages of shared decision-making? ›

disadvantage is that adoption of the wrong advice can get all the business and investment at risk. This is a serious consequence of the shared decision making.

How does shared decision making impact patient centered care and patient outcomes? ›

Numerous studies have shown that shared decisionmaking improves patients' satisfaction with, and involvement in, their health care. Using decision aids and other tools to encourage shared decisionmaking also helps patients feel more engaged in decisions and increases satisfaction with care.

Why is informed decision making important? ›

There are many benefits of making informed decisions, such as increased knowledge, sense of self-confidence, satisfaction with your care, and decreased anxiety and feelings of conflict about your decision.

Why do you think shared decision making is important to be practiced in school? ›

Shared decision making is a process that provides an opportunity for members of a school community to collaborate in solving problems, defining a course of action, and shaping direction for the individual school.

What are the benefits of patient engagement in decision making? ›

Patients who participate in their decisions report higher levels of satisfaction with their care; have increased knowledge about conditions, tests, and treatment; have more realistic expectations about benefits and harms; are more likely to adhere to screening, diagnostic, or treatment plans; have reduced decisional ...

What are the four types of medical decision making? ›

The levels of E/M services recognize four types of medical decision making (straight-forward, low complexity, moderate complexity, and high complexity).

How do you implement shared decision making? ›

The SHARE Approach
  1. Step 1: Seek your patient's participation.
  2. Step 2: Help your patient explore and compare treatment options.
  3. Step 3: Assess your patient's values and preferences.
  4. Step 4: Reach a decision with your patient.
  5. Step 5: Evaluate your patient's decision.

What 5 key communication skills are critical in the healthcare field? ›

Good communication in healthcare is crucial, especially when dealing with patients or their family members.
  • #1: Listen. Listening is the most important part of communication. ...
  • #2: Take Responsibility. ...
  • #3: Be Honest. ...
  • #4: When in Doubt, Say it: ...
  • #5: Be Objective.

Why is effective communication in health and social care important? ›

Effective communication within health and social care settings is very important because it can have a direct, or indirect, impact on the health and social care provided, the overall wellbeing of the patient and on the relationships with patients, family members or colleagues.

Why is communication important in healthcare leadership? ›

Effective leadership starts with communication. The ability to communicate can help healthcare leaders gain the trust and confidence of their entire team, leading to better employee engagement and patient outcomes.

How can you improve communication between patients and healthcare professionals? ›

Five Steps to Improve Communication Between Your Healthcare Staff and Patients
  1. Incorporate effective communication in your organization's mandatory training program. ...
  2. Make communication part of your organization's culture. ...
  3. Implement patient satisfaction surveys. ...
  4. Schedule regular meetings for employees.
1 Jun 2022

What are 5 effective health information communication methods? ›

Here are five ways to ensure effective communication between healthcare professionals.
  • Assess Your Current Method of Communication. ...
  • Streamline Communication Channels. ...
  • Encourage Mobile Collaboration for Effective Communication Between Healthcare Professionals. ...
  • Give Healthcare Employees a Voice.
22 Aug 2022

How does effective patient communication improve the quality and safety of care? ›

Communication throughout a patient's interaction with the health care system, including during diagnosis, treatment, and transitions to other settings of care including the home, helps to ensure patients and family caregivers can participate effectively in their care and make informed decisions.

What are 5 positive outcomes that result from effective communication in healthcare? ›

Effective communication can: Enhance the patient experience; Reduce complaints; Increase nurses' self-confidence, professional standing, career prospects and job satisfaction and reduce stress.

What is effective communication in healthcare? ›

For nurses, good communication in healthcare means approaching every patient interaction with the intention to understand the patient's concerns, experiences, and opinions. This includes using verbal and nonverbal communication skills, along with active listening and patient teach-back techniques.

Why it is important to communicate effectively? ›

By delivering messages clearly, there is no room for misunderstanding or alteration of messages, which decreases the potential for conflict. In situations where conflict does arise, effective communication is a key factor to ensure that the situation is resolved in a respectful manner.

Why is communication a vital part in group decision making? ›

Role of Communication in Group Decision Making

Communication plays a central role in group decision making. Group decisions primarily result from the opinions that group members have about an issue or course of action. Individual opinions can and do change as a result of group communication.

What is the relationship of communication and decision-making? ›

Communication involves transmission of information among individuals and subunits. Decision making uses information to set direction and solve problems.

Why is communication important? ›

In our daily life, communication helps us build relationships by allowing us to share our experiences, and needs, and helps us connect to others. It's the essence of life, allowing us to express feelings, pass on information and share thoughts. We all need to communicate.

What are the 5 importance of communication in an organization? ›

Reap the benefits of effective organizational communication

higher quality of services and products. greater levels of trust and commitment. increased employee engagement and higher levels of creativity. greater employee job satisfaction and morale of employees.

What are the important of decision-making? ›

Strong decision-making helps solve problems promptly and creates a leadership position for the decision-makers. Strong decisions should be impartial and devoid of any emotional influences that might make us overlook shortcomings. Such decision-making should also be transparent and logical.

How can making decisions and setting goals make you a better communicator? ›

Benefits of Personal Communication Goals
  • Make you a better listener.
  • Make you a better speaker.
  • Help you get proper information across in any setting.
  • Give people a true sense of who you are and what you mean.
  • Ensure your message is received properly.

Why is communication important for good relationships and effective management? ›

Effective communication binds all of the members of these complex relationships together enabling everyone in the team to achieve the desired outcomes. Constructive communication and persuasion saves time and effort, encourages co-operation and reduces stress.

What are the decision-making strategies? ›

A 7-Step Decision-Making Strategy
  • Investigate the situation in detail.
  • Create a constructive environment.
  • Generate good alternatives.
  • Explore your options.
  • Select the best solution.
  • Evaluate your plan.
  • Communicate your decision, and take action.

Why is communicating change important? ›

Highlighting the Benefits and the Impacts of Change: Effective communication plan during a change process helps in controlling the inertia or fears due to a change by explaining how the change will affect the people associated with it and why it is being implemented.

How do you use team decisions to communicate? ›

It's a tough task, so here are nine steps to communicating business decisions you don't agree with.
  1. Prepare yourself. ...
  2. Maintain respect. ...
  3. Be specific. ...
  4. Don't send mixed messages. ...
  5. Put yourself in your team's shoes. ...
  6. Remember your remote employees. ...
  7. Allow for venting, not debate. ...
  8. Set clear expectations.

What are the 5 skills communication skills? ›

5 ESSENTIAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS
  • WRITTEN COMMUNICATION. Convey ideas and information through the use of written language.
  • ORAL COMMUNICATION. Convey ideas and information through the use of spoken language.
  • NON-VERBAL AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION. ...
  • ACTIVE LISTENING. ...
  • CONTEXTUAL COMMUNICATION.

Why is communication important in healthcare? ›

Skillful communication enables healthcare providers to establish rapport with their patients, solicit crucial health information, and work effectively with all members of a care team and the public.

What are the 5 ways to improve your communication skills? ›

There are specific things to do that can improve your communication skills:
  1. Listen, listen, and listen. ...
  2. Who you are talking to matters. ...
  3. Body language matters. ...
  4. Check your message before you hit send. ...
  5. Be brief, yet specific. ...
  6. Write things down. ...
  7. Sometimes it's better to pick up the phone. ...
  8. Think before you speak.

What are the 3 basic purposes of communication? ›

Students begin their exploration of motive by generating ideas about why people communicate and organizing them in the three basic categories that media scholars identify: to inform, to persuade or to entertain.

What are the four roles of communication? ›

The four functions of communication are control, motivation, emotional expression, and information.

What are the seven importance of communication? ›

Seven Cs of Communication

These are completeness, conciseness, consideration, concreteness, clarity, courtesy and correctness. Following are the details of 7Cs and their importance in effective communication.

Videos

1. P2P Workshop: Achieving Health Equity in Preventive Services - Day1
(NIH ODP)
2. An Upstream Focus: Rethinking Primary Care Training for Residents
(Icahn School of Medicine)
3. What You Need to Know About the New MD Program: Mini-Retreat for Faculty & Staff (Sept. 9, 2022)
(U of U Health)
4. Webinar 3 – Counselling in Family Medicine by Dr. Mohammed AlAlfi (March, 2021)
(schs.org)
5. Shared Decision Making in Nephrology - BC Renal Province-wide Rounds (Oct 2019)
(BC Renal)
6. Margolis-FDA Workshop: Identifying Key Competencies for Opioid Prescriber Education: Day 2
(Duke Margolis)

Top Articles

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Trent Wehner

Last Updated: 12/16/2022

Views: 6417

Rating: 4.6 / 5 (76 voted)

Reviews: 83% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Trent Wehner

Birthday: 1993-03-14

Address: 872 Kevin Squares, New Codyville, AK 01785-0416

Phone: +18698800304764

Job: Senior Farming Developer

Hobby: Paintball, Calligraphy, Hunting, Flying disc, Lapidary, Rafting, Inline skating

Introduction: My name is Trent Wehner, I am a talented, brainy, zealous, light, funny, gleaming, attractive person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.